Creative Marketing Wins Skeptics

yoga-tnKathryn is a tenured professor at a university in Maryland.

She is a runner, a talented writer and a lover of dogs and Yoga.

(This is not actually a photo of Kathryn, but it IS a Yoga pose.)

Kathryn wants to bring Yoga to everybody, especially to people who believe they are not the “Yoga type.”

To draw more folks to her Sunday Yoga classes, she spreads the word through friends, neighbors, students and email.

Her email is a creative attention getter.

“I am again leading Good Karma Yoga on Sunday, 4 pm, for EVERYBODY!

“We especially welcome skeptics, doubters, newbies, anxious people, un-flexible people, not-stretchy people, old people, broke people, broke-down people, thick people, intimidated people.

“We have mats and everything you need.

“We ask a donation of $5, more if you can afford to share.

“All money goes to yoga for those who cannot afford to access yoga.

“Good for you; good for others; good karma.

“Bring your kids for the Good Karma Yoga if they are over 11.

“I promise you will be glad you did.

“Wear comfortable clothes.

“Every Sunday at 4 pm.”

SUCCESS

Kathryn’s first Yoga class – after spreading the word – was filled with 40 new Yoga students!

On another subject, you can see a different type of creative marketing on this page.
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PS – Update: the “skeptics” who were part of Kathryn’s first Good Karma Yoga class have been back Sunday after Sunday.

 

Read more about Kathryn – along with her actual photo.

 

This Will Make You Think Twice About How You Are Perceived

marketing-conceptsOkay. I’ll admit it: I was taken in by the low price advertising of discount super stores.

*  “Deep Discounts” and

*  “Lowest Prices!”

Like many consumers, I had the impression – the perception – that most products were lower in price at the discount warehouse.

Reality

When shopping for a camera, I compared prices at several different sources:

(1.) A discount super store,

(2.) The Internet

(3.) A small, locally-owned camera store.

Surprise

Not only was there a price difference, but a pretty good-sized price difference.

The camera was the same price in the discount store as on the Internet.

But the price at the small local camera store was $20.00 less!

Two different accessories for the camera were also less expensive at the local camera store.

My price perception was very different than the reality.

Added Value

In addition, the clerks in the discount store knew very little about the features of the camera.

But the person in the local camera store not only told me everything I needed to know about it, he gave me a demonstration and showed me how to use the camera.

Even if the price had been the same or higher, I felt there was a lot more value attached to buying the camera at the local store.

How Are You Perceived?

How do your customers feel about your company?

What is their perception?

Do they really understand the value you offer?

When buyers compare your products and services to discount stores, are they comparing apples to oranges?

Do they know that when they do business with your company, they will be getting much more than just good products?

In the camera-shopping situation, I could have shopped only at the discount store.

But because of the lack of product knowledge available in the discount store, I looked for value and found it at the locally-owned camera store.

The local store does not advertise the extra benefits they offer: locally-owned business, personal service, product knowledge, competitive pricing.

Getting the Word Out

If your customers are not aware that you offer much more than just products, they may shop elsewhere.

If they think price is the only difference between you and your competitors, there may not be much incentive to buy from you.

Using telephone, email, face-to-face and direct-mail marketing that focuses on value, benefits and solutions, will increase customers’ perception that they will gain something more important than just products when they do business with you.

Get Better Answers with This Question

ask-tnIt seems so simple.

Asking questions like:

  • Where did you buy your ____________?
  • How often do you buy ___________?
  • Which brand do you prefer?

The Problem

Prospects lose interest after hearing too many ordinary closed-ended questions.

There is a MUCH better question you can ask – to get the info you need.

The key to getting the best answers:

Keep questions open-ended.

Your initial question can establish rapport, trust and respect.

If they trust and like you they are more likely to buy.

You can get to know their needs and wants better if you ask the right questions.

These would be fact finding – open-ended questions.

Examples – good open-ended questions:

  • “What went into the decision to purchase your copier?”
    (NOT “why did you buy that copier” which puts them on the defensive.)
  • “How are you currently handling back order situations?”
    (NOT “do you have a second source in case you have a back order situation?”)
  • “How would you describe that experience?”

With these questions you can uncover information that will allow you to come back on a follow up appointment and have the information that can motivate them to purchase.

Looking for more ideas on the best questions to ask?

You will learn how to ask questions that get the information you need – in the shortest amount of time, when you are part of my e-course.

In this 4-week one-to-one coaching I will work with you privately to help you create opening statements that can eliminate rejection, create trust and earn new business for you in the next 28 days.

Because this e-Course includes 4 weeks of once-a-week private sales training & coaching where I will work personally with you, the course is limited to the first 10 who register.

When you join me in this one-to-one Sales Success e-Course,

You Will:

• Learn how to create your own unique opening statement which will motivate prospects to become more interested and end up in more sales for you and

• Use authentic words that will cause the prospect to trust you and feel that you are there to help her rather than “just get the sale.”

• Find out exactly how to create trust during the first call.

• Learn the 4 words never to say at the beginning of your outbound phone calls.

• Discover specific questions to ask the prospect that will motivate her to think and share important information you need to move forward with the sale.

• And much, much more.

To register and/or have a conversation about your goals, just send me a message.  I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

 

Here’s wishing you a cool and happy day!

- Ann

 

Don’t Make Another Cold Call …

Brrrr...… until all of your inactive customers have been contacted.

Inactive customers – accounts who purchased something from you in the past – are often forgotten about or neglected.

A True Fact

An encouraging fact about this valuable group of people is that they are (usually) very receptive to your phone calls.

Calls made to these accounts are NOT cold calls.  They are warm calls and sometimes HOT calls.

These businesses know your company’s name.

They trusted you enough to buy from you at least once.

They are the easiest people to sell to.

Ask yourself three questions:

1.  Have all of your inactive customers been contacted during the past three months?

2.  Are all of your current and past customers aware of ALL of the products you have to offer?

3.  Do ALL of your customers buy everything they could possibly buy from you?

If you answered “no” to any of these questions – think about it:

Do you really want to start making cold calls before all of your inactive customers have been contacted?

If your focus is on bringing in new customers by cold calling BEFORE contacting inactive customers, you are leaving money on the table.

Begin Here

You can start contacting inactive (or “lost“) customers by snail mailing or emailing a good re-introductory letter.

There is an excellent win back the lost customer letter in this best-selling e-book containing 63 marketing and business letters you can copy and paste and send immediately.

Cold-calling Tips

After you have contacted all of your inactive customers, there are very effective ways to begin cold calling.

Take a look:

The scariest thing about cold calling

and

Are they listening to you?

and

Solving the gate-keeper dilemma

and

Use these 4 words and your clients will love you

and

How to avoid 3 costly mistakes that kill sales and waste time.

One-to-one Help and Coaching

The next one-to-one sales training e-Course begins on Wednesday. If you have questions or would like to enroll, please send me a message. I’ll get back to you ASAP.  Your BTA educational discount applies to this course!

Does it Always Come Down to Price?

price-writing-tnHas this ever happened to you?

You call a prospect and introduce yourself, your company and your products.

But before you have a chance to ask qualifying questions, the prospect asks:

“What’s your price?”

Important: 

If this prospect is a price shopper, think about this:

Low prices don’t build customer loyalty.

There will ALWAYS be someone who can try and beat your price.

If you want loyal customers, compete on value and not on price.

Don’t Be Shy

If you offer superior service, good product knowledge and excellent products, it is critical to let prospects know this – in every possible way.

When you focus on these positives and anything unique that differentiates you from competitors, you will attract fewer price shoppers.

A Shocking Statistic

According to the findings of a 15-year study conducted by an Atlanta-based sales training organization:

More than 90 percent of all salespeople volunteer a price decrease without being asked!

“More than ever before, customers are choosing to buy from a company not just because it offers a product with a fair price, but also because that company has good values.”
Vanessa Merit Nornberg

3 Ways to avoid the price-quote trap.

 If they ask:  “Can I get a better price?”

One way to answer:

“Yes you can.  When you order two, the item is $59 each. The next price break is at six and instead of $59 each, the price is just $54 each when you order six.  Shall I send you six today?”

When you don’t offer free shipping

If a customer asks for free shipping and your company has a policy of charging for freight, a positive answer works best.  “We’d love to provide free shipping, but we’re simply absorbing our shipping cost and that allows us to give you the low price you’re getting.”

 

Here’s wishing you a happy and productive day!
- Ann

PS:  The next one-to-one sales training e-Course begins on Wednesday. If you have questions or would like to enroll, please send me a message. I’ll get back to you ASAP and –  Your BTA educational discount applies to this course!