An Unexpectedly Awesome Email

girl-child-happyEven though the company’s marketing is always brilliant, this email was unexpectedly awesome.

The personalized nature of the message caught my attention immediately.  Notice how many times the word “you” is used.

Here is the text, with the name of the business not included:

Subject Line: 30% Off for You, One of our Best Customers

“Of course, you’re one of our best customers so you already know that one of the best ways to clear your mind, is to live clean—that means an organic, whole foods diet, environmentally sound supplies for your home, and chemical-free skin care.

“While our blog is dedicated to education in things like healthy living and creating an eco-friendly community, our real passion is providing you with organic and wildcrafted skin care—you know you can trust our products all the way from the ethically sourced, nonGMO seed to the synthetic-free pump in the palm of your hand.

“You’ve been loyal to our line, and we want you to know it isn’t unnoticed, so we made you a 30% off coupon code that you can use for this whole month.

“It expires January 31st so you have plenty of time to use it, but we suggest using it today so that you have the chance to order again with your coupon before month’s end.”

The next day another brilliant email from the same company:

YOU’RE ONE OF OUR TOP CUSTOMERS

“Take 30% off on all full size products through January 31.

“We know for certain that we couldn’t follow our honest, wild, beautiful, path without your loyalty and dedication to your own honest, wild beauty.

“We would love to scream “Thank you, Ann!” from the rooftops but you probably wouldn’t hear us all the way in Virginia Beach so instead, we made you a 30% coupon that you can use for the entire month of January.

“Treat yourself right this year—whether it is stocking up on your old favorites or trying something new—you deserve 30% off any full size or accessory you like—just use code __________ when you’re checking out.

“We don’t offer this coupon but once a year, and only to the select few people, like you, that make our community great.

“So thanks again for a wonderful 2017, and here’s to a beautiful 2018!”

This well-written email had the effect of causing me to feel appreciated as a customer and eager to use the 30% off coupon.

An absolute success!

And… to you from me:  Happy New Year!

Ann

PS: If you have been reading my blog, you know the identity of this successful company :-)

PPS:  If you’d like to receive creative marketing tips and helpful ideas in your inbox a few times a month, feel free to sign up for my newsletter.  Thanks for visiting!

Related:

Creative Marketing Wins Skeptics

This 4-letter Word Earned the Sale

Which Works Best – Kindness or Aggression?

Use These 4 Words and Your Clients Will Love You

Three Examples of Thoughtful Marketing

3 Examples of Thoughtful Marketing

woman-thoughtful-face-on-chin_1_50The process of marketing, when you think about it, first involves emotion.

Think about the new car you purchased and how excited you were the first time you drove the car. There was the “new car smell” and how good you felt driving your new vehicle.

Even the anticipation of buying something you really want is enough to start picturing yourself owning the thing that will fill you with positive emotions.

Successful marketing focuses on how the buyer feels about what is being sold.

Because you care – and you believe your products and services are the best available – think about how you can successfully communicate to prospects the feeling of the excellent quality and benefits you provide.  Because:

“If you have a great offering, weak marketing actually does everyone a disservice.”
– Stefanie Flaxman, Rainmaker Digital

The Importance of Feeling

“Feel” is the first of a 3-step process brilliantly described by Alexandra Franzen in her free 13-page booklet titled Feel. Know. Do.

Examples of Thoughtful Marketing

This attention-getting email I received last week from a website designer was very different from messages sent by other website designers:

Subject line: “I have some exciting ideas for your website.”

The two positive power words in the message: “exciting” and “your” immediately caught my attention. I felt the writer actually read my website and knew how to improve it.  I opened and read the email and saved it for future use and action. 

Feeling Good After the Sale

Just as important as feeling good before the sale, the after-sale feeling is critical.

After I placed an order on the Zulily website, a confirmation of the order arrived by email with these words:

“You have such good taste!”

Even though I realize these words are most likely sent to all buyers after a sale, still it was a “feel good” message.

These are the words on a small brochure included with something I ordered from Amazon and received 2 days later:

“You have in your hands the World’s Best ___________.”

The wording in this brochure made me feel more confident about the quality of this product and happy that I ordered it.  Nice!

Both of these after-the-sale messages began with the word “you,” one of the top positive power words.

Related:

This 4-letter Word Earned the Sale

And

Which Works Best – Kindness or Aggression?

And

Use These 4 Words and Your Clients Will Love You

Thanks for reading.  Have a great day!

- Ann

PS – You can see 18 positive power words on page 4 in this free 24-page workbook, which is a preview of my 4-week one-to-one e-Course.

3 Ways to Recover a Dissatisfied Customer

Customer-loyalty-cycleWhen customers complain, they give you another chance to satisfy their expectations.
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A few years ago an interesting book on this subject by Paul R. Timm caught my attention.
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I love these three customer service tips from one of his books.
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Three Ways to show customers that you’re willing to go the extra mile for them.
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(1.) Use the 2F model.  Let the customer vent.
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Then express your concern and acknowledge the customer’s feelings by using the words “feel” and “felt.”
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In most situations, words like those help you gain the upset customer’s attention so you can start resolving the situation.
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“I understand why you feel this way.I’m sure I would have felt that way too.”
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(2.) Acknowledge the inconvenience
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A simple apology can go a long way, if it is sincere and personal. “I’m sorry you had to wait” sounds better than “the company regrets the delay.”
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(3.) Follow up to see that the problem was solved
.  And always check with the customer to make sure the “fix” held up.
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Words that Matter Most

buddha-tnIt was a few minutes after 4 o’clock on a sunny Thursday afternoon when my mother got the call.

“Your son broke his leg during a basketball game and he has been taken to the hospital.”

She rushed to the hospital where our parish priest met her in the emergency room.

He was a very kind priest who wanted to comfort a distraught mother concerned about her son.  Father Quinn meant well.

In fact he wanted to encourage my mother, assuring her that her son would be okay.

Then he said those first words that ruined everything else he said.

Troubling Words

“Don’t worry, gangrene won’t set in.”

WHAT?

The thought of gangrene had not entered my mother’s mind.

After talking with the doctor, she learned that gangrene was not a possibility.

Whew.  What a relief!

What COULD Father Quinn have said?

Better Words

“Tom will be okay.  The doctor is with him now.”

This would have been much more comforting than his first words, even though Father Quinn meant well.

There are times when our words could be more carefully chosen.

Even when we want to say just the right thing for the immediate situation.

I still regret the first words I said to a co-worker after her 13-year old son had been shot and killed.

“You are strong. You can get through this.”

Kinder Words

I SHOULD have said: “I am so sorry for your loss.”

I really was sorry for her loss and still am. It was a tragic, accidental shooting at a friend’s house who was showing off his father’s gun collection.

Then there are the words never spoken…

…written in a recent post by Alexandra Franzen: “You might be the only one.”

The thoughtful words in Franzen’s post remind us to take the time to reach out to someone who needs a kind word.

Read more about the importance of words on this page

and here

and on this page

and  “Get Better Answers with This Question.”

 

Creative Marketing Wins Skeptics

yoga-tnKathryn is a tenured professor at a university in Maryland.

She is a runner, a talented writer and a lover of dogs and Yoga.

(This is not actually a photo of Kathryn, but it IS a Yoga pose.)

Kathryn wants to bring Yoga to everybody, especially to people who believe they are not the “Yoga type.”

To draw more folks to her Sunday Yoga classes, she spreads the word through friends, neighbors, students and email.

Her email is a creative attention getter.

“I am again leading Good Karma Yoga on Sunday, 4 pm, for EVERYBODY!

“We especially welcome skeptics, doubters, newbies, anxious people, un-flexible people, not-stretchy people, old people, broke people, broke-down people, thick people, intimidated people.

“We have mats and everything you need.

“We ask a donation of $5, more if you can afford to share.

“All money goes to yoga for those who cannot afford to access yoga.

“Good for you; good for others; good karma.

“Bring your kids for the Good Karma Yoga if they are over 11.

“I promise you will be glad you did.

“Wear comfortable clothes.

“Every Sunday at 4 pm.”

SUCCESS

Kathryn’s first Yoga class – after spreading the word – was filled with 40 new Yoga students!

On another subject, you can see a different type of creative marketing on this page.
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PS – Update: the “skeptics” who were part of Kathryn’s first Good Karma Yoga class have been back Sunday after Sunday.

 

Read more about Kathryn – along with her actual photo.