Would This Radical Form of Marketing Work for You?

out-of-the-ordinary-tnIt was a hot, humid day on August 23rd, 2011 when suddenly the empty rocking chair in my home office began rocking back and forth.

Eerie.

Was the ghost of my grandmother visiting?  Not likely.

I turned on the TV and saw that an earthquake had struck Washington, D.C. – and Virginia Beach, where I live.

So THAT was the reason the rocking chair rocked!

Earthquakes in D.C. and Virginia Beach are rare.  I don’t remember one – ever.

We have occasional hurricanes here but not earthquakes.

What does this have to do with marketing?

Well . . .

. . . not being a frequent TV watcher, I began – after the earthquake – keeping the TV on  – on mute…just in case.

Every now and then I looked up at the TV to see if anything unusual was happening.

That was when I became aware of the quirky Duluth Trading television advertising . . .

. . . focusing on the negative stuff you can avoid if you buy their products.

At first, I smiled because of the unusual wording and graphics.

But, then I had to turn the volume up because…

did that Duluth commercial say what I thought it said?

“Crouch without the ouch.”

And

“How to fix plumber’s butt.”    What?

“Buck-naked underwear” with a “no-bull guarantee.”

The commercial that sold me was “The no-yank tank” because it is two inches longer than most women’s tanks.

You don’t have to yank it down when you’re crouching or bending over.

I bought one and liked it so much I bought two more when they were on sale.

It helps that Duluth sells high quality products that live up to its advertising.

Results

Duluth Trading has nearly doubled its sales in just two years, thanks to its quirky ads, including an animated “buck-naked” underwear guy.

I love this quote from Dan Neil of the Los Angeles Times:

“Duluth Trading practices a radical form of marketing known as honesty.” 

Could radical, quirky advertising work for your business?

Would “no-jam copiers” get attention?  I don’t know, but Duluth ads get the attention of millions and have dramatically increased sales.

A Creative Quirky Ad

The only slightly quirky ad I have seen is this creative flyer from a handy man.

A Lovable Ad 

This is one of my favorite ads ever, even though it is slightly misleading.  To really appreciate this ad, read all the way to the end.

Want to Brighten Someone’s Day?

There is an example of an award-winning funny and attention-getting voice mail message in this e-book.

 

Your Easiest Break-Up Ever

break_up_advice-tnWhen I saw this headline in the local newspaper, it almost seemed to jump off the page.

It was a small ad in the bottom right-hand corner of the page.

The headline immediately captured my attention, curiosity and interest.

I wondered what it was all about.

Three Seconds to Grab Attention

If the headlines in your emails, direct-mail letters, newpapers or flyers are under-performing, then it is costing you sales.

No doubt about it.

When selling products or services by email, direct mail or on the Internet you have about three seconds to make your point or lose the reader.

The headline in this ad was such a great attention- getter that I immediately read the ad then clipped it out of the newspaper.

Capturing Attention

In this ad there was a photograph of a young, attractive blonde woman next to the headline.

But I had no idea what product the ad was supposed to be selling.

The headline made me curious, so I HAD to read the ad copy and it was good – it also explained the wording in the headline.

You could actually change the text a bit and use it for any type of product or service.

This was the text:

“Your hair deserves the best.  It should not have to settle.
If your current stylist doesn’t get your hair or takes it for granted . . .
it is time to move on.”

After that paragraph, a telephone number was listed, along with the name of a local beauty shop.

So, how do you create a GREAT headline if you are not a professional copywriter?
Glad you asked :-)

Five Tips to Writing Great Headlines

Five tips that will empower you to write a great headline today.

1.   Make your headline short.

Five to seven words works very well. You can be more expansive in the sub-head, once you have your visitors’ attention.

2.   Use a question as your headline.

The point of your headline is to get people to stop long enough to read the rest of the message or consider your site. Asking a question is a great way to do this, if you ask the right question.  HINT: The right question is always one that can be answered by your product.

3.   Be clear.

Tell the reader exactly how your product will help them.

(There are exceptions. Although this “Break-up” headline was not clear, it made me curious enough to read the entire ad.)

4.   Use a “number of steps” formula.

If your product will solve a problem in a certain number of steps, say so. People love simple solutions to their problems.

Or . . . use a “number of ways” formula. Use this instead of a number of steps.

5.   In an advertisement, a good headline takes up 50% of the ad space.

Print ads should have enough white space surrounding the headline to make it a clean and obvious central focus point.

Want some help?  Join my private one-to-one e-Course and I will help you create attention-getting ads and emails!