An Unexpectedly Awesome Email

girl-child-happyEven though the company’s marketing is always brilliant, this email was unexpectedly awesome.

The personalized nature of the message caught my attention immediately.  Notice how many times the word “you” is used.

Here is the text, with the name of the business not included:

Subject Line: 30% Off for You, One of our Best Customers

“Of course, you’re one of our best customers so you already know that one of the best ways to clear your mind, is to live clean—that means an organic, whole foods diet, environmentally sound supplies for your home, and chemical-free skin care.

“While our blog is dedicated to education in things like healthy living and creating an eco-friendly community, our real passion is providing you with organic and wildcrafted skin care—you know you can trust our products all the way from the ethically sourced, nonGMO seed to the synthetic-free pump in the palm of your hand.

“You’ve been loyal to our line, and we want you to know it isn’t unnoticed, so we made you a 30% off coupon code that you can use for this whole month.

“It expires January 31st so you have plenty of time to use it, but we suggest using it today so that you have the chance to order again with your coupon before month’s end.”

The next day another brilliant email from the same company:

YOU’RE ONE OF OUR TOP CUSTOMERS

“Take 30% off on all full size products through January 31.

“We know for certain that we couldn’t follow our honest, wild, beautiful, path without your loyalty and dedication to your own honest, wild beauty.

“We would love to scream “Thank you, Ann!” from the rooftops but you probably wouldn’t hear us all the way in Virginia Beach so instead, we made you a 30% coupon that you can use for the entire month of January.

“Treat yourself right this year—whether it is stocking up on your old favorites or trying something new—you deserve 30% off any full size or accessory you like—just use code __________ when you’re checking out.

“We don’t offer this coupon but once a year, and only to the select few people, like you, that make our community great.

“So thanks again for a wonderful 2017, and here’s to a beautiful 2018!”

This well-written email had the effect of causing me to feel appreciated as a customer and eager to use the 30% off coupon.

An absolute success!

And… to you from me:  Happy New Year!

Ann

PS: If you have been reading my blog, you know the identity of this successful company :-)

PPS:  If you’d like to receive creative marketing tips and helpful ideas in your inbox a few times a month, feel free to sign up for my newsletter.  Thanks for visiting!

Related:

Creative Marketing Wins Skeptics

This 4-letter Word Earned the Sale

Which Works Best – Kindness or Aggression?

Use These 4 Words and Your Clients Will Love You

Three Examples of Thoughtful Marketing

3 Examples of Thoughtful Marketing

woman-thoughtful-face-on-chin_1_50The process of marketing, when you think about it, first involves emotion.

Think about the new car you purchased and how excited you were the first time you drove the car. There was the “new car smell” and how good you felt driving your new vehicle.

Even the anticipation of buying something you really want is enough to start picturing yourself owning the thing that will fill you with positive emotions.

Successful marketing focuses on how the buyer feels about what is being sold.

Because you care – and you believe your products and services are the best available – think about how you can successfully communicate to prospects the feeling of the excellent quality and benefits you provide.  Because:

“If you have a great offering, weak marketing actually does everyone a disservice.”
– Stefanie Flaxman, Rainmaker Digital

The Importance of Feeling

“Feel” is the first of a 3-step process brilliantly described by Alexandra Franzen in her free 13-page booklet titled Feel. Know. Do.

Examples of Thoughtful Marketing

This attention-getting email I received last week from a website designer was very different from messages sent by other website designers:

Subject line: “I have some exciting ideas for your website.”

The two positive power words in the message: “exciting” and “your” immediately caught my attention. I felt the writer actually read my website and knew how to improve it.  I opened and read the email and saved it for future use and action. 

Feeling Good After the Sale

Just as important as feeling good before the sale, the after-sale feeling is critical.

After I placed an order on the Zulily website, a confirmation of the order arrived by email with these words:

“You have such good taste!”

Even though I realize these words are most likely sent to all buyers after a sale, still it was a “feel good” message.

These are the words on a small brochure included with something I ordered from Amazon and received 2 days later:

“You have in your hands the World’s Best ___________.”

The wording in this brochure made me feel more confident about the quality of this product and happy that I ordered it.  Nice!

Both of these after-the-sale messages began with the word “you,” one of the top positive power words.

Related:

This 4-letter Word Earned the Sale

And

Which Works Best – Kindness or Aggression?

And

Use These 4 Words and Your Clients Will Love You

Thanks for reading.  Have a great day!

- Ann

PS – You can see 18 positive power words on page 4 in this free 24-page workbook, which is a preview of my 4-week one-to-one e-Course.

Creative Marketing Wins Skeptics

yoga-tnKathryn is a tenured professor at a university in Maryland.

She is a runner, a talented writer and a lover of dogs and Yoga.

(This is not actually a photo of Kathryn, but it IS a Yoga pose.)

Kathryn wants to bring Yoga to everybody, especially to people who believe they are not the “Yoga type.”

To draw more folks to her Sunday Yoga classes, she spreads the word through friends, neighbors, students and email.

Her email is a creative attention getter.

“I am again leading Good Karma Yoga on Sunday, 4 pm, for EVERYBODY!

“We especially welcome skeptics, doubters, newbies, anxious people, un-flexible people, not-stretchy people, old people, broke people, broke-down people, thick people, intimidated people.

“We have mats and everything you need.

“We ask a donation of $5, more if you can afford to share.

“All money goes to yoga for those who cannot afford to access yoga.

“Good for you; good for others; good karma.

“Bring your kids for the Good Karma Yoga if they are over 11.

“I promise you will be glad you did.

“Wear comfortable clothes.

“Every Sunday at 4 pm.”

SUCCESS

Kathryn’s first Yoga class – after spreading the word – was filled with 40 new Yoga students!

On another subject, you can see a different type of creative marketing on this page.
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PS – Update: the “skeptics” who were part of Kathryn’s first Good Karma Yoga class have been back Sunday after Sunday.

 

Read more about Kathryn – along with her actual photo.

 

This Will Make You Think Twice About How You Are Perceived

marketing-conceptsOkay. I’ll admit it: I was taken in by the low price advertising of discount super stores.

*  “Deep Discounts” and

*  “Lowest Prices!”

Like many consumers, I had the impression – the perception – that most products were lower in price at the discount warehouse.

Reality

When shopping for a camera, I compared prices at several different sources:

(1.) A discount super store,

(2.) The Internet

(3.) A small, locally-owned camera store.

Surprise

Not only was there a price difference, but a pretty good-sized price difference.

The camera was the same price in the discount store as on the Internet.

But the price at the small local camera store was $20.00 less!

Two different accessories for the camera were also less expensive at the local camera store.

My price perception was very different than the reality.

Added Value

In addition, the clerks in the discount store knew very little about the features of the camera.

But the person in the local camera store not only told me everything I needed to know about it, he gave me a demonstration and showed me how to use the camera.

Even if the price had been the same or higher, I felt there was a lot more value attached to buying the camera at the local store.

How Are You Perceived?

How do your customers feel about your company?

What is their perception?

Do they really understand the value you offer?

When buyers compare your products and services to discount stores, are they comparing apples to oranges?

Do they know that when they do business with your company, they will be getting much more than just good products?

In the camera-shopping situation, I could have shopped only at the discount store.

But because of the lack of product knowledge available in the discount store, I looked for value and found it at the locally-owned camera store.

The local store does not advertise the extra benefits they offer: locally-owned business, personal service, product knowledge, competitive pricing.

Getting the Word Out

If your customers are not aware that you offer much more than just products, they may shop elsewhere.

If they think price is the only difference between you and your competitors, there may not be much incentive to buy from you.

Using telephone, email, face-to-face and direct-mail marketing that focuses on value, benefits and solutions, will increase customers’ perception that they will gain something more important than just products when they do business with you.